Carob Cluster Oil Free Granola

You’ve had my recipe for low-sugar granola, and now I want to share with you this oil free Carob Cluster granola! It has a subtle sweet nutty flavour and is still super crunchy thanks to a special trick that works every time.

For this recipe I decided to use Brazil nuts, which are high in fat. So to compensate for this I took out the oil that I’d usually use. Most of the fat in Brazil nuts is mono-unsaturated, which helps to lower levels of ‘LDL’ (bad cholesterol) and improve levels of ‘HDL’ (good cholesterol). This fat also helps you to absorb the vitamin E from the nuts to improve your skin and hair quality. Importantly, I chose to use Brazils because they are a wonderful source of selenium. This vitamin is important for metabolism  and deficiencies may cause premature aging, cataracts and frequent infections.

Hopefully now that you know about the benefits of Brazil nuts you’ll find this recipe even more enjoyable! I know I certainly feel good when I eat a healthy breakfast that sets me up for the day ahead.

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Serves 5
0.2 of your 5-a-day
(Eat with some fruit please!)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup organic rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup brazil nuts
  • 1 tbsp carob powder*
  • 1 tbsp lucuma powder
  • 2 tbsp agave syrup
  • 1/2 cup mixed dried berries^

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  2. Chop up the Brazil nuts. Leave some as 1/2cm chunks, some as flakes and chop the rest very finely.
  3. Mix together the nuts and powders then pour over the agave syrup. Stir it well to make sure that all of the oats are coated.
  4. Transfer the mixture to a baking tray and press down until it’s about 1/2 cm thick.
  5. Cook for 10 minutes then turn off the oven and leave the door slightly ajar.
  6. When the oven has totally cooled down (I usually leave it at least an hour) remove the granola and leave to cool on the side. If there are any slightly burnt bits round the side you can eat them to hide the evidence.
  7. When the granola has cooled transfer to an air-tight jar.

*I used Savvy ‘oven roasted’. I’ve tried to make granola with a different carob powder which was much darker in colour and it was no where near as nice.
^I used The Foodie Market Berry Mix. I got it from Aldi- it’s naturally sweetened and has a great mix of fruit including tart cherries and inca berries!

Did you know….

This granola contains soluble and insoluble fiber, which will aid your digestion.

 

What’s your favourite granola?

 

14 Comments

  1. February 21, 2016 / 9:23 am

    Looks delicious! I might put the brazilian nuts I bought the other day into good use 🙂

    • February 21, 2016 / 9:36 am

      Definitely do it. I recommend the carob powder- it’s makes it sweeter, but if you don’t have any you might be able to sub it for cocoa powder and an extra tbsp of sweetener.

  2. February 22, 2016 / 12:57 am

    Wow I need try this out for myself!

  3. February 22, 2016 / 1:43 am

    Can’t wait to try Brazil nuts! Very informative post.

    • February 22, 2016 / 1:05 pm

      Thanks 🙂 I think Brazil nuts often get overlooked but they have so many wonderful nutrients.

  4. February 22, 2016 / 5:00 pm

    We love Brazil nuts but usually just for snacking. This looks really good!

  5. February 22, 2016 / 5:16 pm

    Thanks. It’s nice to hear people are healthy snacking.
    I used to love snacking on them covered in chocolate but they’re so morish!! I have to restrain myself now 😛

  6. February 24, 2016 / 12:26 am

    Brazil nuts are so delicious! I love them too! But just a gentle reminder that they actually are very high in selenium. A single Brazil nut (depending on the size) contains more than your daily requirement, so it’s best to only eat a few a day maximum. 🙂 Thanks for sharing this lovely post!

  7. September 10, 2016 / 1:55 am

    I love granola, this looks delicious! 🙂
    However, being gluten free, I have to substitute oats with quinoa flakes.

    • Heathy & Psyched
      September 10, 2016 / 9:58 am

      I’m sure this would work well with quinoa flakes as well, although I have only tried them as a porridge.
      Can you eat buckwheat?

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